alternatives

Update of the Worldwide Integrated Assessment (WIA) on systemic insecticides

The Task Force on Systemic Pesticides — an international group of independent scientists convened by the International
Union for Conservation of Nature — produced the world’s first comprehensive scientific assessment of the ecological effects of neonicotinoids in 2015. This landmark review, which considered more than 1,100 peer-reviewed studies, as well as data from manufacturers, identified clear evidence of harm to honeybees as well as to a large number of other beneficial species, including aquatic insects at the base of the food chain, soil arthropods such as earthworms, and common birds (by cascade effects).
In 2017, the Task Force updated its assessment to take into account hundreds of new peer-reviewed studies (published since 2014) on systemic insecticides in the environment and their ecological effects. The new assessment reveals broader impacts that reinforce the conclusions of the original 2015 review: neonics and fipronil represent a major worldwide threat to biodiversity and ecosystems/ecosystem services.
The 2017 update is now published in the scientific journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research in 3 parts.

Summary: Highlights from the 2017 update to the Worldwide Integrated Assessment of the effects of systemic pesticides on biodiversity and ecosystems

Part I Part 1: new molecules, metabolism, fate, and transport

Part 2 Part 2: impacts on organisms and ecosystems

Part 3 Part 3: alternatives to systemic insecticides

Syndicate content